IMPORTANT INFORMATION PRIOR TO YOUR VISIT.

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Senior Eye Care

As we age, our eyesight changes as well. Annual eye exams are critical for early diagnosis of many sight-threatening conditions.

There are ways to effectively, but there are several sight-threatening conditions:

Advances in optometry make it easier to slow the progress of these conditions, and future innovations will only help optometrists in the coming years. Early diagnosis is currently the best way to ensure a favorable prognosis, so make sure to keep up with your regular eye exams as you get older.

SENIOR VISION CHANGES

A few of the most common changes that can happen to our vision with age include:

  • Presbyopia: the vast majority of adults over age 45 begin to struggle with close vision as the lenses in their eyes become less flexible. This is why reading glasses, bifocals, and transition lenses are staples of the older decades.
  • Changes to color perception: the older we get, the more colors may grow dull or yellowish.
  • Reduced tear production: our eyes produce fewer tears as we age, which can result in symptoms of dry eye. We need tears to maintain clear vision and maintain eye health, so this can be quite an inconvenience.
  • Requiring more light to see: we begin to need more light to see clearly as we get older.
  • Increased glare: this can be a serious problem while driving, Crizal 360 anti reflective treatments and wearing polarized sunglasses can limit the glare.

HOW TO MAINTAIN HEALTHY VISION OVER AGE 60

The minimum are annual eye exams. But there’s more an individual can do to look after their eye health. Wear UV-blocking sunglasses outside year round. Regular exercise, a plant based diet, increasing omega-3, lutein and xeazanthin intake, and not smoking greatly reduce risk factors, and you’ll also get all the other benefits that come with a healthier life!”

Dr. Tapuwa Chikwinya specializes in senior eyecare at Tacoma Eye at Westgate. Read more about Dr. C. here.